Workers fed up with nights, weekends seek flexible schedules

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Balsam Hill Outlet sales associate Rickey Haynes, right, listens to manager Kelly Bratt during training in Allen, Texas, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. Retailers, restaurants and others are grappling with increasing demands in the last few months from hourly workers for more flexible schedules, going beyond  a better salary and  bonuses. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies are confronting demands by hourly workers on terms that used to be non-negotiable: scheduling.

That has meant pushing back on weekends, late nights, or holiday shifts. Hourly workers are taking a page from their white-collar peers who are restructuring their workdays to accommodate their lifestyles.

Similarly, hourly workers are seeking flexibility in how — and when — they do their jobs.

Desperate for hired hands, companies are responding by adjusting schedules to meet worker demands. But they are limited in what they can do given the nature of how they operate, especially with customers who have grown accustomed to getting what they want when they want it.

Balsam Hill Outlet retail manager Kelly Bratt, right, talks with sales associate Rickey Haynes during on-the-job training in Allen, Texas, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. Retailers, restaurants and others are grappling with increasing demands in the last few months from hourly workers for more flexible schedules, going beyond  a better salary and  bonuses. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

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