LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — The nation’s report card is out and shows a deep decline in math and also a dip in reading which is a result of the pandemic’s effect on learning.

The National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), also known as the nation’s report card shows how students are performing in both public and private schools across the nation.

A sample of fourth and eighth-grade students are assessed in both math and reading and about 9,300 students from 182 throughout Nevada took these tests.

Nationally, on average fourth-grade students scored three and 5 points lower in math and reading when compared to the 2019 test results. Eight-grade students scored three and eight points lower. The math results were the steepest decline ever recorded.

Overall in Nevada, eighth-grade reading scores stayed consistent from the 2019 test results while eighth-grade math scores dropped five points.

  • For eighth-grade students, 65% tested at or above NAEP Basic in 2022 in reading.
    • CCSD performed the same or higher than 92% of other large districts.
    • Scores for students with disabilities, white students, Asian American-Pacific Islanders, and students from two or more races remained consistent in 2019.
  • In math, 54% of eighth-grade students tested at or above NAEP Basic in 2022.
    • CCSD performed the same or higher than 84% of other large districts.
    • Scores for eighth-grade white, African American, and Asian American-Pacific Islander students remained unchanged from 2019.

Fourth-grade students in Nevada scored six and seven points lower in math and reading tests when compared to 2019.

  • In reading, fourth-grade students tested at or above NAEP Basic in 2022.
    • CCSD performed the same or higher than 72% of other large districts.
    • Scores for students with disabilities, English language learners, and Asian American- Pacific Islander students remained the same from 2019.
  • For math, 65% of fourth-grade students tested at or above NAEP Basic in 2022.
    • CCSD performed the same or higher than 72% of other large districts.
    • Scores for fourth-grade white, Asian American-Pacific Islander, two or more races, and students with disabilities have scores that remained consistent from 2019.

As for Clark County, the Council of The Great City Schools Executive Director, Ray Hart said in part the students have already returned to the same performance levels observed prior to the pandemic in eighth-grade reading.

CCSD Superintendent Dr. Jesus Jara also commented on this year’s results.

“With the year’s NAEP data, we see some encouraging results; however, the reality is these numbers serve as a roadmap for the investments we need to make with the remaining COVID funding,” said Dr. Jara.

To help improve performance, CCSD has invested in curriculum and programs that will help the district accelerate students’ learning and academic recovery. Those programs include:

  • Paper: This service provides all students with free access to online tutoring services. Paper is available to students through their Clever accounts. This service is funded through ESSER.
  • Summer Learning Programs: CCSD has offered their primary summer learning opportunities free of charge to accelerate all students’ academic, social-emotional, and behavioral development.
  • ELL Endorsements for teachers: CCSD teachers can now earn a master’s degree in English Language Learning (ELL) with an ELAD endorsement at no cost to them, through Project Pueblo, providing CCSD teachers with the knowledge and skills to beer support English language learners.
  • Tier I English Language Arts Instructional Materials: This will implement a consistent curriculum for Tier I instruction in ELA for Kindergarten–Grade 12 will increase reading achievement across the district.