Pulse Nightclub, 1 October shooting victims share stories of survival

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More than three months after the 1 October tragedy, survivors from the Pulse Nightclub massacre in Orlando are sharing their stories.

Survivors said they want 1 October survivors to know that almost two years later they are still healing, but it’s not just victims they had a message for, they had a message for our first responders too.

”Sometimes we must deal with the suffering before we can deal with the better upbringing,” Pulse survivor Christopher Hansen.

It’s been almost two years, but Christopher Hansen can still remember the nightclub shooting in Orlando.

“The honking at the stoplight could trigger, the flashing of lights at light, you just never know,” Hansen said.

Hansen was there to have a good time. Just like everyone at the Route 91 Harvest Festival on 1 October.

“We were living life and we had, a crazy event happens as well,” Hansen added.

Omar Delgado was at the Pulse Nightclub that night too. He wasn’t there for fun, he was there to answer the call. Delgado was a police officer that turned into a local hero.

“Everyone just kept boosting me up even though I was in a real dark place, I didn’t take that way because I felt I just did my job,” Delgado said.

The aftermath for Delgado turned into Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. With almost 10 years as an officer, Delgado lost his job.

“It was a small town and they just didn’t have the resources,” Delgado said.  

Hansen and Delgado are sharing their stories again, hoping that they can help 1 October victims.

“My sister said, “brother I don’t want to read the article, I want you to talk to me about it. tell me how you feel. “and I was like “okay” so one day I did,” Hansen said.

Attorney Antonio Romanucci represents survivors from the Pulse Nightclub and 1 October shooting.

“When Pulse was the worst mass tragedy in American history,” Romanucci said. “Now we have another one. So, what are we going to do to prevent this?”

In part, Romanucci says, by sharing stories of survival and by listening to their pains, we are always learning something.

“I would express that everybody has patience with that because it is a large amount of money and there are many claimants. it’s going to be hard to sort out in just a matter of months,” Romanucci said.

Hansen and Delgado both said that the most important thing survivors can do is seek help. They will have one more meeting at the Clark County Library.

Both men will be there offering legal and monetary advice, as well as sharing their stories of healing.

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