WASHINGTON (KLAS) — Citing a diverse and increasing population, Nevada Democrats made their formal pitch Wednesday to the Democratic National Committee in their push to become the first state to vote in presidential primaries.

Nevada is among the four states that have kicked off the nominating process since 2008: Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina. The Iowa Caucuses are the first in the nation, with the New Hampshire primary after that.

The Nevada Legislature voted last year to change the presidential candidate nomination process from a caucus to a primary.

Iowa and New Hampshire contests have been criticized because both states are overwhelmingly white. Iowa is just over 90% white, 3.7% Black and 2.4% Asian. New Hampshire is nearly 93% white, 2.6% Asian and 1.6% Black.

By contrast, more than half of Nevada is non-white, Clark County Commissioner William McCurdy said during Wednesday’s presentation. Nevada is the third-most-diverse state, he said.

“Nevada embodies the Democratic coalitions we will need to win national elections and we cannot allow our party to focus solely on tradition at the expense of real representation,” he said.

“We are ethnically diverse. We look like the rest of the nation,” Sen. Jacky Rosen, who worked on the campaign, previously told 8 News Now.

As part of their presentation, representatives from the Nevada Democratic Party showed a video featuring Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto and Rep. Steven Horsford.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders won the Democratic caucuses in 2020.

The DNC is expected to make its decision in August.

The Republican primary is not affected and Nevada will continue to be the first-in-the-West state in that contest.