Rank the candidates: Voting could change if trend gains traction

National News

This absentee ballot for the 2020 Maine general election, photographed on Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 in Falmouth, Maine, shows how Maine voters are allowed to rank presidential and senate candidates in order of ranked choice preference. An electoral reform that has taken root in the iconoclastic states of Maine and Alaska could be gaining traction nationwide. After decades of theoretical discussions among policy wonks, advocates of ranked-choice voting are looking to expand the concept. (AP Photo/David Sharp)

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — An electoral reform that has taken root in the iconoclastic states of Maine and Alaska could be gaining traction nationwide.

After decades of theoretical discussions among policy wonks, advocates of ranked-choice voting are looking to expand the concept.

They’re turning to Wisconsin, Virginia, Utah and other states, building on a successful campaign in Alaska last year.

Fueling the effort is voter disgust with the current crop of elected officials, particularly in Congress. Virginia congressman Don Beyer is a supporter.

He said momentum is building but it could be a decade or more before ranked-choice voting is available to many Americans.

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