Nevada classrooms now required to have carbon dioxide detectors to measure air quality

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Studies show measuring gas can show poor ventilation, risk for disease

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — A new Nevada law requires carbon dioxide detectors to be installed in every classroom.

Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak signed the bill on Thursday. It passed the state legislature along party lines in May.

The bill states nearly half of school buildings across the country need their ventilation systems replaced and fail to meet standards. A buildup of carbon dioxide has shown to adversely affect student performance, the bill said.

Studies show measuring carbon dioxide in the air is a good indicator of poor ventilation and the risk of catching an airborne disease, the I-Team reported in April.

A University of Colorado-Boulder study supports that finding carbon dioxide in the air “holds promise” for monitoring the risk for coronavirus and other airborne diseases. This is because a buildup of carbon dioxide is a good indicator for stagnant, unventilated air, the study said. The more stagnant the air, the higher risk of getting an airborne disease.

Nevada’s law goes into effect July 1. California also has a law requiring carbon dioxide monitors in every classroom statewide.

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