LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — College students have faced unique challenges during the last two years amid the pandemic. Several studies have shown that a larger percentage of students have reported increased stress, anxiety, and depression.

According to a 2021 report by the Mayo Clinic Health System, upward of 44% of college students report symptoms of depression and anxiety.

It’s a trying time of year for college students as they head into final exams or prepare for graduation.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month and a good reminder to check in with those people around you to make sure they are doing OK.

Southern Nevada Community College sophomore Nyla Marquez said going from in-person classes to online instruction during the pandemic was challenging. She said she felt lonely and had low motivation. Fortunately, she identified her issues early on and knew she had to get some help.

She also recognizes it’s not easy for people to reach out for help.

“It sounds kind of corny, but you’re not alone. There’s a reason why there’s Mental Health Awareness Month and why there are different services available. It’s always best to try and help yourself first because your mental health matters more than just some assignment that you need to do or any job you need to work for,” Marquez said.

She said developing a strong support system was key and encourages students to reach out to teachers and other students on campus.

Both CSN and UNLV offer CAPS, counseling and psychological services for students, free of charge.