LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Attorney General Aaron Ford outlined the initial dispersal of opioid settlement money in Nevada Tuesday.

The money will come from Nevada’s share in a multi-state settlement with the three largest opioid distributors, an agreement with opioid manufacturer Johnson & Johnson, its U.S.-based Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies, and a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Before costs, Nevada will receive approximately $71 million in 2022, to be divided into five behavioral regions by the Department of Health and Human Services.

Clark County Behavioral Region

Clark County, Boulder City, Henderson, Las Vegas, North Las Vegas, and Mesquite will receive approximately $26.3 million.

In 2020, 542 Clark County residents died from unintentional opioid overdoses, and opioid prescription rates were 72.2 per 100 people in 2017.

Washoe County Behavioral Region

Washoe County, Reno and Sparks will receive approximately $3.7 million.

In 2020, 166 Washoe County residents died from unintentional opioid overdoses, and opioid prescription rates were 87.4 per 100 people in 2017.

Northern Nevada Behavioral Region

Douglas County, Lyon County, Storey County, Churchill County, Carson City, Fernley, and Central and North Lyon Fire Districts will recieve approximately $2 million.

In 2020, 37 people died as a result of opioid-related deaths in the region.

Rural Nevada Behavioral Region

Humboldt County, Pershing County, Lander County, Eureka County, White Pine County, Elko County, Ely and West Wendover will receive approximately $1.4 million.

In 2020, seven people died from unintentional opioid overdoses in the region.

Southern Nevada Behavioral Region

Mineral County, Esmeralda County, Nye County, and Lincoln County will receive approximately $854,000.

In 2020, approximately 20 people died from unintentional opioid overdoses in the region.

Nevada reported a 55% increase in opioid-related deaths between 2019 and 2020.

“Because Nevada secured money from these opioid settlements, local Nevada communities will be able to put funding — this year — toward desperately needed programs and services to begin to abate this crisis,” said AG Ford. “The funds will reach those who are most in need of assistance as opioid-related deaths continue to rise in our state.”