Experts say year of distance learning was not a ‘lost year’ for students; pandemic also brought achievements

Local News

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Next week, the school year will be out for the summer. But with the pandemic tying up most of the school year, one can’t help but wonder if the 2020/21 school year was a lost year.

After a year of distance learning — the short amount of time they had to learn in person didn’t seem to last long enough for the Black family.

“They were just adjusting to the schedule and routine, and then summer happened,” Mandi Black said about her two daughters.

So when Mandi learned that the Clark County School District was offering summer school, she jumped at the chance to sign her 10-year-old daughter Ivy and he4r 5-year-old daughter Betty right up.

The academics are important, but I really like the idea they get to see their school friends for an extra month,” Mandy said.

The pandemic has shown us how much we need interaction and involvement with each other, which is especially true for the nation’s growing youth.

The Goddard School has heard from parents who are worried about what some are calling “the lost year.”

“They may have gotten, let’s call it, an ‘untraditional time of learning,’ but they’re engaged with parents more frequently, learning from siblings; maybe they’re learning from others in their environment. This idea they’ve lost a year, we don’t accept that notion, rather we believe they’ve grown and continued to develop,” Dennis R. Maple, President, and CEO, Goddard Systems, Inc.

Maple adds there are benefits of a structured learning environment and children being able to engage socially and face-to-face with their peers. 8 News NOW Reporter Kirsten Joyce has more on the story.

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