The full COVID-19 report for Nov. 29-Dec. 5 appears below.

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — After weeks of COVID-19 hospitalization increases, new cases have started to grow faster in Clark County and around the state, according to information released Wednesday.

A total of 3,969 cases were reported statewide, with 2,885 in Clark County over the past week. That marks a 50.9% increase over last week when looking at the 14-day moving average (per 100,000 population). County and state case levels are now back where they were in early August, data released by the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services shows.

The current average of new daily cases of COVID-19 in Clark County is 249, and 324 statewide. A year ago, that average was at 653 as the omicron spike was about to begin.

Last week, the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention adjusted Clark County’s community level from “low” to “medium.” If numbers continue to climb at rates seen in Wednesday’s reports, the county could quickly find itself back at “high” community level. The CDC uses community level to describe the risk of transmission and the pressure on hospitals to handle patient loads. The CDC updates community level data every Thursday.

Hospitalizations are still growing steadily — now at 311 patients in Clark County, an 11% increase over last week. And while hospitals are able to handle the influx of patients, there is growing pressure as hospitals struggle to provide pediatric care. Hospitals are at 74% capacity statewide, and 76% in ICU units. Pediatric hospital beds are at or above 100% occupancy as RSV, COVID-19, flu, rhinovirus and enterovirus cases put a strain on available beds.

A “significant number” of children ages 0-4 years old are seriously ill with respiratory illnesses, putting pressure on pediatric hospital care as young patients fill available beds all over the state, according to information provided by the Nevada Hospital Association (NHA).

NHA reports that the number of flu hospitalizations increased from 141 to 162 statewide over the past week.

About 17% of all emergency room patients report COVID-19 symptoms, NHA said.

The increase in cases comes after Thanksgiving gatherings and warnings from health officials that the winter months could bring a surge of new COVID-19 cases.

Case levels, like hospitalizations, are back to levels from late summer, when numbers were falling from a surge in cases that started in May and peaked in mid-June.

Information from the Southern Nevada Health District shows that the dominant variant in Clark County’s cases over the past 30 days is COVID-19 BQ.1.1 (44.8% of cases), followed by COVID-19 BQ.1 (31.0% of cases).

Nevada reported 27 deaths linked to COVID-19, with 22 from Clark County. Nevada’s total number of deaths from the pandemic now stands at 11,657, with 9,108 from Clark County.

Updates have stopped on the empower.unlv.edu page devoted to reporting on wastewater surveillance. We will continue to monitor for updates in the future.

If you have symptoms, get tested and avoid spreading the virus to others. If you haven’t been vaccinated, go to the Southern Nevada Health District’s website for information on getting a shot, or updating your immunity by getting a booster.

CLARK COUNTY

  • New daily confirmed cases (14-day moving average, per 100,000 population) 249 — up from 165 the previous week. (+50.9%)
  • Total cases: 607,302*
  • Deaths: 22 since last week (total: 9,108)
  • Hospitalizations: 311 (up 32 from the previous week)
    *-A difference in case counts exists between SNHD and the state. By SNHD’s current count, Clark County has had 588,504 cases as of this week.

NEVADA

  • New daily confirmed cases (14-day moving average, per 100,000 population) 324 — up from 224 the previous week.
  • Total cases: 800,851
  • Deaths: 27 since last week (total: 11,657)
  • Hospitalizations: 359 (up 19 from the previous week)

The county’s COVID-19 community level moved to “medium” on Thursday, Dec. 1, after staying at “low” since Aug. 11, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

See last week’s report here.