LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Two Las Vegas men are accused of buying and selling stolen catalytic converters, netting them big bucks, according to the FBI.

Louis Rodriguez and Josue Reynoso face charges of conspiracy to commit interstate transportation of stolen property, records showed.

The men work for an unnamed catalytic-converter recycling company in Nevada, documents said. The FBI alleges the pair purchased stolen catalytic converters and then sold them to another company, documents the 8 News Now Investigators reviewed said.

A criminal complaint the 8 News Now Investigators reviewed Wednesday alleged the pair bought dozens of catalytic converters from undercover FBI employees, totaling thousands of dollars in cash.

This photo provided by the Phoenix Police Department shows stolen catalytic converters that were recovered after detectives served a search warrant at a storage unit in Phoenix on Thursday, May 27, 2022. (Phoenix Police Department via AP)

In all, the undercover employees sold 71 converters for more than $16,000, documents said.

The company, which received the alleged stolen converters, paid the men’s company more than $4 million in wire transfers between March 2021 and July 2022, documents said.

FBI investigators allege the pair knew the catalytic converters were stolen. Officials issued warrants for the duo’s arrests on Tuesday. The warrants were unsealed in court documents Wednesday, indicating arrests were complete.

The arrests come on the same day as FBI offices across the country arrested nearly two dozen people on similar charges. It was unclear Wednesday if Rodriguez and Reynoso were included in the FBI’s nationwide number.

In 2021, Las Vegas Metro police responded to more than 1,900 catalytic-converter calls, the 8 News Now Investigators reported earlier this year. Each call could be for one stolen converter or several. Out of the 1,900-plus calls, 98 were closed as of this summer, meaning officers made an arrest or issued a citation.

The catalytic converters themselves have no identifier tying them back to the vehicle identification number (VIN) every car is issued. That means there is no way to quickly identify to which car — and to which owner — the part belongs.

This photo provided by the Phoenix Police Department shows stolen catalytic converters that were recovered after detectives served a search warrant at a storage unit Phoenix on Thursday, May 27, 2022. (Phoenix Police Department via AP)

Several states have passed laws or are currently passing laws to curb these thefts. In Connecticut, scrap metal processors and junkyard owners must record information about the seller, including his or her license plate number and license. Connecticut law now also limits sellers to one catalytic converter a day per dealer and cash is banned.

The Nevada Legislature reconvenes in January and will likely hear at least one catalytic-converter-related bill.

Metro police and the FBI have several tips to protect your converter from being stolen or to try to track it back to you if it is stolen. They suggest always parking in a well-lit area and having your license plate or VIN engraved on your converter. If your catalytic converter is stolen, you should file a report immediately.