LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — A new flight path out of Reid International Airport is angering neighbors below, but their frustration is only growing as they say the federal government is ignoring them.

The Federal Aviation Administration implemented its Las Vegas Metroplex Project in February. The project, meant to streamline and secure the airspace in and out of Las Vegas went into effect following several public meetings.

The FAA has instituted several other Metroplex projects, including in Los Angeles, Denver and Miami. Several communities are now suing the government for similar noise-related seasons.

Neighbors and county commissioners said they were told a new flight path for general aviation aircraft would not cause any impact. But the FAA classifies chartered and private flights in that umbrella, neighbors and commissioners said.

That has led to some loud wake-up calls, among other nuisances.

“They’re very big,” Jennifer Johnston, who lives under the new flight path in Western Trails near Warm Springs Road and Arville Street, said. “They’re very loud and they are definitely affecting our neighborhood in a major way.”

The new flight path takes some general aviation flights departing from runway 19L from the airport above the southwest valley. The planes are then required to make a right-hand turn toward the northwest as they leave the airspace.

FILE – In this March 19, 2020, file photo a plane takes off at then-named McCarran International Airport, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

The reason for the change, according to a preliminary document for the project, was to eliminate “the need to taxi across two runways to depart” and simplify workflow.

The FAA controls the airspace. County commissioners and airport officials have no say in what happens once the planes leave the ground.

“I bought a house that wasn’t under a flight path and now I’m living under a flight path that was implemented by the FAA and Metroplex,” Johnston said.

Representatives from the FAA gave a presentation about the project and neighbors’ concerns during a commission meeting last month.

Neighbors and county commissioners said they were told a new flight path for general aviation aircraft would not cause any impact. But the FAA classifies chartered and private flights in that umbrella, neighbors and commissioners said. (KLAS)

“I’m far from satisfied on this,” said Commissioner Michael Naft, whose district encompasses the area under the flight path.

Naft said the flight path had more than 1,500 inappropriate uses since it opened in February. He also cited the increasing use of larger, nosier planes for general aviation.

“We are going to stay on top of them,” Clark County Commission Chair Marilyn Kirkpatrick said, adding she and her six colleagues are the ones getting the phone calls about the issue, not the FAA.

During their presentation, FAA officials said the new procedures are saving about 2 gallons of jet fuel and about 30-40 seconds of flight time on average.

“If that’s the case, if there’s truly no benefits, then why are we making changes that impact people?” Kirkpatrick said.

Estimates on fuel and time saved from the Las Vegas Metroplex Project. (KLAS)

“I mean, I’ll give them the $20 for gas,” Johnston said Tuesday.

During the commission meeting, representatives from the FAA said it does not have a policy of meeting with neighbors. That upset commissioners and Johnston.

“We’re very angry,” she said. “We’re very upset and we have no answers. The commissioners are trying. We’re doing everything we can to try to remedy this situation and it’s actually getting worse.”

The problem could only get worse as more sporting events and potential baseball and basketball teams come to Las Vegas.

Kirkpatrick said commissioners have reached out to Nevada’s representatives in Washington.