Nearly nine in 10 American workers said they would support a four-day workweek, fully remote work or a combination of in-person and remote work, according to a new survey released on Wednesday.

The Bankrate survey found that 89 percent of Americans who work full-time or are seeking full-time jobs support more flexible work options, including 81 percent who said they would support a four-day workweek.

Another 68 percent said they supported a hybrid work schedule, while 64 percent said they supported a fully remote work schedule, the survey found.

“Whether currently working or aspiring to work, now that people have seen or experienced changes forced by the pandemic, there’s no putting that proverbial genie back in the bottle,” Mark Hamrick, a senior economic analyst with Bankrate, said in a statement. 

“At the same time, employers must adapt to these shifts while striving for success and greater productivity,” he added. “Otherwise, many of their employees are going to seek work elsewhere.”

Just over half — 51 percent — of those who support more flexible work options said they would be willing to sacrifice something, including their current jobs, in order to make it happen, the Bankrate survey found. 

Some 89 percent of workers who support a four-day workweek said they would be willing to make changes, including 54 percent who said they would work longer hours on the remaining workdays and 37 percent who said they would change jobs or industries.

Nearly three-quarters —73 percent — of those who support a hybrid work schedule similarly said they would make sacrifices in order to make it happen. Another 37 percent said they would change jobs or industries for hybrid work, 28 percent also said they would work off-peak hours, like weekends or evenings.

Workers who support a fully remote schedule were slightly more likely to say they were willing to change jobs or industries to obtain their ideal work schedule, with 42 percent saying they would make the jump. Some 35 percent also said they were willing to work off-peak hours, while 28 percent said they would work a job they were less interested in.

Even as American workers show widespread interest in more flexible work options, employers are increasingly pushing for them to return to the office. 

Zoom, which emerged as a key video communications tool for remote work during the pandemic, announced earlier this month that its employees who live near an office would be required to work in-person two days a week.

White House chief of staff Jeff Zients also urged federal agencies to increase in-person work in a recent letter to cabinet officials.

The Bankrate survey was conducted July 20-24 with 1,137 U.S. adults who work full-time or are looking for full-time employment.