LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — A man faces a murder charge in connection with the overdose death of a 16-year-old Las Vegas girl, court documents said.

Roy Elkhoury, 27, is accused of providing a fentanyl pill that killed the teenager in March. The teenager, whose name is redacted in the documents, was found deceased inside a friend’s apartment on March 5. Autopsy results showed the girl had fentanyl in her system at the time of her death, Las Vegas Metro police said.

Drug cartels are manufacturing illicit fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid that is 50-to-100 times more potent than morphine, and combining it with other drugs. Just a few grains are deadly.

Elkhoury told police he received his pills from a Mexican dealer, documents said.

Investigators determined the teenager and her friend had taken pills, which they believed to be Xanax and Percocet before the overdose, police said. Metro’s lab tested the pills, finding them laced with over-the-counter pain medication and fentanyl.

“The victim’s phone showed her having ordered narcotics from the suspect’s phones multiple times,” police wrote in court documents.

FILE – This undated file photo provided by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for Utah and introduced as evidence at a trial shows fentanyl-laced fake oxycodone pills collected during an investigation. (U.S. Attorneys Office for Utah via AP, File)

Police took Elkhoury into custody on May 28. Police said a search of his home found “numerous amounts of narcotics” and a handgun with no serial number.

When speaking to investigators, Elkhoury said he “knowingly provided [the teenager] with a fentanyl pill” and “asked her if she had Narcan,” investigators said.

Elkhoury faces charges of second-degree murder and the sale of a controlled substance.

Judge Daniel Westmeyer set bail at $100,000. Elkhoury remained at the Clark County Detention Center as of Thursday. A booking photo for Elkhoury was unavailable as of Thursday.

Over the past several years, Metro police and the Clark County District Attorney’s Office have charged dealers, suspected of providing fatal doses of drugs, with second-degree murder.

(File photo of a fentanyl pill shown in this article.)