New Clinical Trial May Help Diabetics With Foot Wounds - 8 News NOW

New Clinical Trial May Help Diabetics With Foot Wounds

Posted: Updated:

People with diabetes are far more likely to have a foot amputated than other people. And the trouble often starts with a sore on their foot that won't heal, but instead keeps getting worse.

In today's Dealing with Diabetes report, a local podiatrist tells us how a new treatment, being tested in Las Vegas may help.

Las Vegas resident and diabetic, Michael Hanson, doesn't know how or when his latest foot ulcer developed. But he does know enough about diabetes to have it looked at right away.

"And all of a sudden there was a blister there. And by the next day, it started to get worse, so I came in and saw the doctor," he said.

While she's tending to his wound, podiatrist Cyaandi Dove tells Hanson that he might be a candidate for a clinical trial that's testing a new medicine. It's a topical gel called Excellarate. It consists of bovine DNA attached to a form of flu virus.

"And the purpose of this treatment is to stimulate the growth of new blood vessels and new tissue," said Dr. Dove.

Dr. Dove says Excellarate is now in a phase 2 clinical trial -- and must pass two more trials to prove its safety and effectiveness. And considering that 15-percent of diabetics develop foot ulcers, the more tools doctors have to work with, the better off patients will be.

"Because typically, these wounds, chronic wounds are stagnant. And you see no improvement. It's not getting smaller or larger. So when we have a new therapy such as this type of therapy, DNA based, hopefully we'll start to see new tissue formation and more rapid closure of the wound."

It could be another four years before the treatment is approved. In the meantime, Dr. Dove suggests diabetics get in the habit of inspecting the bottom of their feet daily.

For more information on Excellarate, click here. For information on local participation in the clinical trial, contact Dr. Cyaandi Dove: (702) 696-9005

  • Paula's Health NotesLas Vegas Health NewsMore>>

  • Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 3:39 PM EDT2014-07-29 19:39:02 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
  • New therapies for epilepsy

    New therapies for epilepsy

    Friday, July 25 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-25 19:00:14 GMT
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
  • Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:08 AM EDT2014-07-24 04:08:05 GMT
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KLAS. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.