Local Support Group Wants Breast Cancer Patients to Stay Hydrated - 8 News NOW

Local Support Group Wants Breast Cancer Patients to Stay Hydrated

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A local support group is trying to keep up with their exercise, despite the discouraging heat wave. Exercise helps prevent weight gain, and in turn may help lower your risk for breast cancer. It also gives an added boost to the immune system.

But Holly Lyman with Greenspun Women's Center says someone who's recently been through chemotherapy should be careful not to overdo it. And the heat wave calls for even more caution.

Milder forms of exercise like hatha yoga can be better, and hydration is critical.

"In hot weather like this, if you're going through chemotherapy, you're already kind of in a state of dehydration. So you want to maintain hydration. You need to drink more water if you're exercising when you're on cancer treatment," said Lyman.

Studies have suggested that exercise can improve the quality of life for breast cancer survivors. But progressing slowly is a sound precaution -- after checking with your doctor.

Susan G. Komen For The Cure offers more tips on staying healthy during the summer.

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