Nearly 8-Percent of Women Develop Gestational Diabetes - 8 News NOW

Paula Francis, Anchor

Nearly 8-Percent of Women Develop Gestational Diabetes

Posted: Updated:

Nearly eight out of every 100 pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes -- a form of diabetes that only surfaces during pregnancy. In this week's Dealing with Diabetes report, we take a closer look at the condition -- that for some, may be a blessing in disguise.

As a diabetes educator, Las Vegas resident Heather Lamar guides women through diabetes and pregnancy. And she has personal experience. "It was right before I actually was pregnant that I got diagnosed with diabetes."

Lamar kept tight reins on her diabetes -- by eating right, exercising and checking her blood sugar several times a day. In the end, she delivered a healthy baby boy. Now, she uses her own experience to help other women get through gestational diabetes.

Las Vegas obstetrician-gynecologist, Joey Adashek specializes in complicated pregnancies. "Gestational diabetes is a disease of pregnancy where the glucoses are elevated, or the sugars are elevated due to the pregnancy itself."

Most women who have gestational diabetes deliver healthy babies. However, untreated or uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause problems for the patient and the baby.

"Gestational diabetes increases this risk for large babies. Significant increase in C-sections," said Dr. Adashek.

Risk factors for gestational diabetes include age. Women over the age of 25 are at higher risk. Another is having a family history of type-2 diabetes. And being overweight also puts you at higher risk.

Fortunately, in most cases, gestational diabetes goes away after pregnancy. But the condition increase the chances of developing type-2 diabetes a few years down the road. For this reason, Dr. Adashek says it serves as a wake-up call.

"And you can actually change your lifestyle so you won't develop diabetes later in life," he said.

"Sometimes it is a blessing that you were diagnosed because you're probably going to live longer and healthier because of the changes in your lifestyle," said Lamar.

For more on this, click here.

  • Paula's Health NotesLas Vegas Health NewsMore>>

  • Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 3:39 PM EDT2014-07-29 19:39:02 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
  • New therapies for epilepsy

    New therapies for epilepsy

    Friday, July 25 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-25 19:00:14 GMT
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
  • Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:08 AM EDT2014-07-24 04:08:05 GMT
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KLAS. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.