Children With Diabetes Relax at Camp Vegas - 8 News NOW

Paula Francis, Anchor

Children With Diabetes Relax at Camp Vegas

Posted: Updated:

Children with diabetes face special challenges, even when they're just spending a week at camp. A local camp is giving these kids a chance to relax, make new friends, and enjoy the great outdoors like any other kid. Eye on Health visited Mount Potosi for this week's Dealing with Diabetes report.

At Camp Vegas, three dozen children with Type-One diabetes are having fun and learning more about their disease. Each morning after breakfast, they check their glucose levels and give themselves insulin -- if they need it. For some, this will be the first time they've "self-administered," as the doctor calls it.

Erika Knight, 13, says the camp gives her a chance to talk with others in the same boat. "Because we can share things, like when we were diagnosed, like what did you go through. I was diagnosed last year. And I like to share how I was diagnosed and so other kids can relate and so I know it's not only me."

Camp director, Sarah Bieski knows exactly what Erika means. She herself was diagnosed as diabetic at age 5. Bieski says the camp provides an opportunity for bonding and also instills a can-do attitude. "I can remember a couple of years ago, where the kid said 'I can't go on a hike, I'm diabetic.' I was like, take a number. We're all diabetic, and we're going on this hike. So if they get that persona they can do anything, I think that helps."

The staff at Camp Vegas includes a physician, nurses, and dietitians. Several of them are diabetic as well. Bieski says if diabetes is managed well early on in life, it's less likely to place limitations on a child's future.

"And if they can understand why it's so important to manage it at such a young age, and we all know its easier to teach kids when they're younger, there doesn't have to be any complications. Diabetes is a very manageable disease," Bieski says.

Camp Vegas is one of 5 regional camps organized by the Nevada Diabetes Association for Children and Adults.

Email your comments to Anchor Paula Francis.
  • Paula's Health NotesLas Vegas Health NewsMore>>

  • Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 3:39 PM EDT2014-07-29 19:39:02 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
  • New therapies for epilepsy

    New therapies for epilepsy

    Friday, July 25 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-25 19:00:14 GMT
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
  • Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:08 AM EDT2014-07-24 04:08:05 GMT
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KLAS. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.