Treating Diabetic Neuropathy - 8 News NOW

Paula Francis, Anchor

Treating Diabetic Neuropathy

Posted: Updated:

A painful tingling in the feet and a loss of balance are a couple of the problems caused by diabetic neuropathy. In this week's "Dealing with Diabetes" segment, the Eye on Health Team spoke with a local surgeon who's offering a new approach to treating it.

North Las Vegas resident, Janice Leger, has a family history of diabetes. Both her grandmother and her father died of complications from the disease.

"My grandmother, before she passed away, her legs... both legs, were amputated," Leger said.

Leger was diagnosed with diabetes 10 years ago. Like her grandmother, she gradually developed peripheral neuropathy. The condition causes the feet to go numb on the outside and be in constant pain on the inside.

"And it's shooting. It's knife pains. And it's worse at night, laying in bed trying to go to sleep," she said.

The usual course of medication didn't help. So Leger turned to Las Vegas surgeon, Darren Soong -- for a new procedure called nerve decompression.

Dr. Soong said, "It involves decompressing the nerves that we believe get compressed when conditions such as diabetes cause the nerves to swell."

Decompression surgery relieves pressure on swollen nerves, using three incisions. The procedure loosens the nerve bundles, improving circulation. Dr. Soong is careful in selecting patients for the procedure, because it's fairly new. Not everyone with diabetic neuropathy would be a candidate.

Dr. Soong said, "A significant amount of people have relief of their pain. But more importantly, we can restore their sensation so they can actually feel better and improve their balance as well."

Leger had one foot done and already has plans to do the other.

She said, "I could feel my foot again and my leg again. And there was no more tingling. No more shooting pains. No more numbness."

Dr. Soong compares nerve decompression to a similar method used to treat carpal tunnel in the hands.

Dr. Darren Soong, MD: 384-8446

  • Paula's Health NotesLas Vegas Health NewsMore>>

  • Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Prostate frozen lumpectomy offers patients an alternative

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 3:39 PM EDT2014-07-29 19:39:02 GMT
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
    More than 230,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer this year according to the American cancer society. In most cases, surgical removal of the gland is considered the gold standard of treatment, but results of a new study suggest a new treatment might benefit some patients.More>>
  • New therapies for epilepsy

    New therapies for epilepsy

    Friday, July 25 2014 3:00 PM EDT2014-07-25 19:00:14 GMT
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
    pilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects more than 2.5 million Americans. Uncontrollable seizures plague these patients’ lives. Until now, the only treatments were drugs and major surgery, but new therapies are on the horizon.More>>
  • Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Study touts health care workers with less than bachelor's degree

    Thursday, July 24 2014 12:08 AM EDT2014-07-24 04:08:05 GMT
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
    Among Las Vegas workers with less than a bachelor’s degree only 3.5 percent hold jobs in the most common health care occupations, the lowest percentage among the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, the Brookings Institution reported Wednesday night.More>>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KLAS. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.