Alarming Fatality Rate for Blue Diamond Road - 8 News NOW

Adrian Arambulo, Reporter

Alarming Fatality Rate for Blue Diamond Road

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Suzan Hudson lives just off it and in January she saw someone die in what she calls "her backyard." Suzan Hudson lives just off it and in January she saw someone die in what she calls "her backyard."
Along with other changes, the effort has led to 29-percent fewer crashes. But while things are improving here, Nevada State Trooper Kevin Honea says they're getting worse on highways overall. Along with other changes, the effort has led to 29-percent fewer crashes. But while things are improving here, Nevada State Trooper Kevin Honea says they're getting worse on highways overall.

'Click It or Ticket' Kicks In

There have been 27 fatalities on State Route 160 in the last year, and now there are crosses at each spot where a person died.

The main causes of these crashes may not be what you think, but in fact, you can help stop these crashes from happening. But this two lane dusty highway claims an average of about two lives a month.

Suzan Hudson lives just off it and in January she saw someone die in what she calls "her backyard."

"They pulled the woman from the car, we saw the grief of the people who knew her, it was a horrible day for us," Hudson said.

So Hudson helped organize an effort to put up crosses at each location where a person died as reminders to passers-by to be careful. And it seems to be working. Along with other changes, the effort has led to 29-percent fewer crashes. But while things are improving here, Nevada State Trooper Kevin Honea says they're getting worse on highways overall.

"We're alarmingly above last year as far as fatals go," Honea said. The number one type of fatal crash on our highways for the beginning of the year -- single car roll-overs. It's hard to tell why but many drivers seem to be risking their own lives.

"Nationwide, sleepy or fatigued drivers were the number one reason of fatalities and serious injury crashes," Honea explained. Distractions are another contributing factor.

"When you're talking on a cell phone, you're exhibiting the exact same behavior as person driving under the influence of alcohol," Honea added.

These two are hoping their stories send a simple message of being careful.

Click here to email reporter Adrian Arambulo

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