Flood control officials warn of active flood season - 8 News NOW

Flood control officials warn of active flood season

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Flooding at Sahara Ave. Sept 2012 Flooding at Sahara Ave. Sept 2012
Flooding along Grand Teton Rd. 2013 Flooding along Grand Teton Rd. 2013

LAS VEGAS -- As the monsoon season rolls into southern Nevada the Regional Flood Control District wants to remind people of the potential danger the storms bring. 

People have been rescued from their cars on Sahara Avenue near the Desert Rose Golf Course and roads have turned into rivers in the far northwest valley.

In the off season, the Regional Flood Control District has spent millions to keep dangerous flood waters away from homes and off streets.

Gale Fraser with the district says the organization has been busy. Fraser has been going to city council meetings around southern Nevada to warn of the potential threat.

"It’s a novelty, but it's a hazardous novelty, and it's almost certain death if you get into these fast moving waters,” Fraser said. "In my mind, there is no reason that there should be a loss of life. If the water is running down the street, don't drive through it."

Flood control officials have been hitting the air waves with public service announcements and put up billboards to remind everyone to stay out of flood channels. They are also working on keeping flood waters away from homes. A notorious spot is being worked on near Sahara Avenue and Sloan Road.

"Our biggest project is the Desert Rose Golf Course on the Las Vegas Wash. Virtually all of North Las Vegas drains through there with two-thirds of the Vegas valley draining through there,” Fraser added

Fraser says fewer problems are expected in the northwest part of the valley this year because work is complete along a one-and-a-half-mile stretch of Grand Teton Road. The flood waters will now be channeled underground.

"What is harder is keeping people away from floods,” Fraser said.

Fraser says the storms will come and he wants the valley to be ready for all circumstances.

The Regional Flood Control District has completed five projects within the past year at a cost of $40 million.

There are 18 more projects that will begin soon with a price tag of almost $200 million.

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