I-Team: How Jerad Miller got weapons used in deadly shooting - 8 News NOW

I-Team: How Jerad Miller got weapons used in deadly shooting

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LAS VEGAS -- Police shooter Jerad Miller was a convicted felon, but he still was able to gather several guns, which he and his wife Amanda used to kill three people Sunday.

The I-Team uncovered how the Millers were able to assemble an arsenal.

Metro Police say Jerad and Amanda Miller had multiple handguns and a shotgun when they died inside Wal-Mart. The law forbids Jerad Miller from ever owning a gun.

Since Amanda Miller lived with Jerad, she legally wasn't supposed to own guns either.

Jerad Miller complained online in May 2012 that he and his girlfriend were forbidden to own firearms because of his felony record.

Miller was convicted of felony criminal recklessness for pointing a gun at someone in Indiana in 2007. In 2010, he was convicted of felony marijuana possession in Indiana.

On May 8, 2014, Miller posted on Facebook that he needed a rifle and asked friends for help. The Millers stayed with a neighbor the days before the shooting. She said the guns were registered in Amanda Miller’s name.

"In Indiana, is my understanding, it was all registered in Amanda's name, because he was a felon so he couldn't have any guns," roommate Kelly Fielder said.

The I-Team asked Metro Police if Amanda Miller registered for a blue card in Clark County, which is required for all Clark County handgun owners, but so far, the department has not answered that question.

At this time, Metro Police says there is no record of any officer ever interacting with the Millers before the shooting. So, there was no apparent way that Metro would have known felon Jerad Miller had easy access to multiple guns.

Democratic State Senator Justin Jones wrote a bill last legislative session that would require all private purchases of firearms in Nevada to go through a licensed dealer.

In a statement released Tuesday, Jones said, “the steady stream of shootings and senseless violence just reinforces the belief of many Nevadans that we need to act to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous felons and severely mentally ill. No one bill can prevent all gun deaths, but we can--and must--find a way keep our neighborhoods safe from gun violence while also protecting law-abiding citizens' second amendment rights."

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