Parkinson's: Stop the Shaking - 8 News NOW

Parkinson's: Stop the Shaking

Posted: Updated:
  • Paula's Health NotesLas Vegas Health NewsMore>>

  • New procedure to help Lipedema

    New procedure to help Lipedema

    Friday, August 22 2014 3:55 PM EDT2014-08-22 19:55:58 GMT
    Some women just can't lose weight and for the estimated 11 percent of women with a chronic disorder, diet and exercise won't help at all. Now, there is a new procedure doctors are now using that can help restore their appearance.More>>
    Some women just can't lose weight and for the estimated 11 percent of women with a chronic disorder, diet and exercise won't help at all. Now, there is a new procedure doctors are now using that can help restore their appearance.More>>
  • Fixing gerd for good

    Fixing gerd for good

    Tuesday, August 19 2014 3:21 PM EDT2014-08-19 19:21:39 GMT
    Acid reflux disease, a condition commonly known as “GERD”, affects about one-third of Americans. It can cause pain, coughing, heartburn and can even lead to cancer. Now, a simple procedure may fix GERD for good.More>>
    Acid reflux disease, a condition commonly known as “GERD”, affects about one-third of Americans. It can cause pain, coughing, heartburn and can even lead to cancer. Now, a simple procedure may fix GERD for good.More>>
  • Ice cold heart therapy

    Ice cold heart therapy

    Friday, August 15 2014 5:05 PM EDT2014-08-15 21:05:13 GMT
    A trial fibrillation affects about 2.7 million Americans. It's a condition that causes heart palpitations, shortness of breath and dizziness. If left untreated, it can be life-threatening. Now doctors are freezing the problem away.More>>
    A trial fibrillation affects about 2.7 million Americans. It's a condition that causes heart palpitations, shortness of breath and dizziness. If left untreated, it can be life-threatening. Now doctors are freezing the problem away.More>>

PITTSBURGH (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease has been a successful treatment option for more than a decade, but only for some patients. Now a new technique is changing the game and helping thousands of more people get the treatment they so desperately need.

Toni Pais is 59 years old. He's a hands-on restaurant owner who is often prepping for the dinner crowd by himself. However, tremors from Parkinson's disease almost forced him to quit.

"It's very dangerous because you are dealing with fire with hot pans, sometimes you try to shake the pan, your brain wants to move, but your muscles don't," Pais told Ivanhoe.

Medication was losing its affect. Pais couldn't tolerate the traditional surgical method for implantation of deep brain stimulators, which would require him to be awake during surgery. During DBS, surgeons implant thin electrodes at very specific targets in the brain to deliver electrical pulses. Doctors interact with the patient to ensure the electrodes are in the correct place.

"The problem is, there is a significant population of patients with Parkinson's who are too anxious, or too symptomatic, or both to undergo awake surgery in the frame," Mark Richardson, MD, PhD, Director of Epilepsy and Movement Disorders Surgery, UPMC, told Ivanhoe.

Now surgeons have begun performing the procedure on patients who stay "under" the whole time using customized software and an MRI machine. Surgeons attach an aiming device to the skull and the surgeon maps the trajectory of the electrode in real time.

More than one year after surgery, Pais says his tremors are minimal, so are his other symptoms.

"Now if I"m relaxing, sleeping, lying down, [or] contemplating, I"m calm as calm can be," Pais explained.

UPMC researchers say a preliminary analysis of patient outcomes shows there is no difference in side effects or benefits for patients who undergo the procedure asleep.

NEW TECHNOLOGY: Deep brain stimulation is a technique that has been used for years now to treat conditions like Parkinson's, dystonia, and essential tremor. The procedure to put the electrode in place usually takes place with the patient awake, because brain mapping is easier when the patient isn't under anesthesia and so doctors can periodically check with the patient. However, now doctors can use MRI to place the electrodes needed for the neurostimulator. This means the patients can be put under general anesthesia for the surgery. The MRI helps doctors visualize in real time where the electrode needs to be placed. This is important for patients who are nervous, can?t tolerate being awake, or too dystonic to be still during a surgery. (Source: www.upmc.org)

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:
Anita Srikameswaran
Senior Manager, Media Relations,
UPMCsrikamar@upmc.edu


 

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and KLAS. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.