Metro Defends Change to Accident Response Policy - 8 News NOW

Metro Defends Change to Accident Response Policy

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Metro Sgt. Todd Raybuck/Metro Traffic Section Metro Sgt. Todd Raybuck/Metro Traffic Section

LAS VEGAS -- Questions continue to mount about Metro Police's new accident response policy.

Starting Monday, Metro Police will not respond to minor accidents or fender benders. Under the policy, drivers who cause damage to your car won't get a ticket and police won't take a report at all.

Out of the more than 23,000 accidents Metro responded to last year, 60 percent were property-damage only.

Wearing a neck brace, Gary Olson is still recovering from his accident last year. Metro responded, but not rapidly.

"They did at mine on the west side there, it was about two hours," Olson said.

Waiting for Metro to show up is common.

"Last year, our average response time to all accidents, property damage and injury accidents included, took at least 90 minutes and sometimes upwards of two hours for police officers to respond," Metro Sgt. Todd Raybuck said.

WEB EXTRA: Police Answer Questions on New Accident Policy

Metro says its new policy of not responding to accidents where no one was hurt will free up officers for more important calls.

However, many drivers like Wendy Shearer are concerned police won't be there to ticket someone who crashed into to your car just because you weren't injured.

"I'm really blown away with that," Shearer said. "They need to reconsider their decision."

Metro says it is no different than if someone backed into your car in a store parking lot.

"The reality is that we haven't responded to property-damage-only accidents for many, many years, and those accidents occur frequently in our valley all day long. There are not people being beaten up in parking lots because somebody ran into another car and things like that." Sgt. Raybuck said.

Starting Monday, if your car gets wrecked, even badly, and you're not injured, hope that the drivers cooperate and exchange all the important information, because Metro won't respond.

"It is a good thing in a way and a bad thing in a way." Olson said.

The policy is designed to free up cops for more serious accidents like the one in which Gary Olson was injured.

Metro says it takes about 90 minutes for an officer to take a report on these minor accidents. Police won't be taking accident reports at area commands either.

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