Overcrowding Plaguing Dozens of Schools - 8 News NOW

Overcrowding Plaguing Dozens of Schools

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LAS VEGAS -- Clark County School District schools are more overcrowded than ever before, according to the district.

Some elementary schools are currently nearly 80 percent over capacity. Now, the school district is considering some difficult options for campuses in the so called hot spots.

The hot spots include 65 elementary schools in Clark County. If the student population at those schools keeps growing, families may be forced to make some major adjustments.

Surprisingly, the biggest problem is not in new neighborhoods on the edge of the city, but in older neighborhoods. 

On a typical day at Long Elementary School, parents say their children have plenty of company, maybe a little more than they want to see.

"Last year, there were close to 30 kids in her class," parent Sam Harvey said.

"It is just the amount of kids they have in the class. It is just unbelievable," parent Marlene Marquez said.

According to the latest numbers by the Clark County School District, more than 50 elementary schools are at least 25 percent overcapacity.

At Long Elementary, they have close to 80 percent more students than the current campus can hold.

"Our teachers go above and beyond regardless of the circumstances," Long Elementary principal Joyce Brooks said.

For principal Brooks, the circumstances are challenging. Her classrooms are so packed, she needs close to 20 portables this year to house all the students.

One solution the school district is looking into is making more elementary schools year round, so class sizes are more manageable. It would be like taking five students from every class of 30.

"They get more one-on-one instruction than they would in a group. Whatever makes a difference for our kids is better for academics. I'm all for it," Brooks said.

Other options on the table, include shifting some students to nearby schools, but for Long Elementary that is not possible, because the three closest schools are also overcapacity.

"I don't know what they can do. They can't make the school bigger," parent Sam Harvey said.

Last year, Clark County residents voted down a ballot measure that would have generated more than $700 million to build two new schools and replace two others.

Starting now, different schools are holding meetings with parents so they can get feedback on proposed changes.

No decision will be made until next school year.

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