Special Legislative Session Delayed - 8 News NOW

Jonathan Humbert, Investigative Reporter

Special Legislative Session Delayed

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Road projects have already been delayed across the state. That means what you see now is all we'll probably get for years. Road projects have already been delayed across the state. That means what you see now is all we'll probably get for years.
Now the delay only raises the stakes on the roads, in the classrooms and behind bars. Now the delay only raises the stakes on the roads, in the classrooms and behind bars.

A stunning development out of Carson City late this afternoon as Governor Gibbons has delayed the special session. It will still happen, just not Monday. It will start next Friday instead.

All of this comes as the new numbers indicate a much bigger budget shortfall than some were saying. The Governor's Office says this is because new unemployment numbers are worse than expected and tourism numbers are down.

Sources say that bickering over the final dollar total of the shortfall may be a major factor as well. The Economic Forum is leaning toward nearly $300 million extra, while Assembly Democrats say it's closer to $100 million.

But the session is still a go and it appears when the hammer drops, southern Nevada had better get used to the same old same old.

If you hate traffic and want a better commute, if you worry about the quality of your child's education, and if the thought of prisoners being released early is unsettling, you'll want to watch Carson City next week. Nevada's budget shortfall has captured attention in all walks of life, including the incarcerated.

"We are going to probably find ourselves against the wall in the near future," said Prisons Director Howard Skolnik.

Skolnik plans to close Nevada State Prison. The state's cells are clogged and arrest rates are up, "That means more bad guys are going to go to prison and that means we'll need more prison beds."

Road projects have already been delayed across the state. That means what you see now is all we'll probably get for years.

Bart Boulton has been teaching for 29 years. He retires on Tuesday after feeling forced out due to budget problems. The state retirement plan won't pay for him unless he gets out now and cost of living raises may face the ax.

"It's actually encouraging the most experienced people to leave early," he said. Now the delay only raises the stakes on the roads, in the classrooms and behind bars.

The governor has actually shortened the time he plans for the session -- it's now a three day session starting Friday, June 27, 2008 and going through the weekend. Granted, there is time next week for all sides to come to an agreement, but a shorter session should mean some long nights.

The governor's planned speech to address the budget issue will happen Thursday night, on the eve of the session. The governor will essentially outline his goals and hopes for the session.

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