New Survey Reveals More People Want to Leave Las Vegas - 8 News NOW

New Survey Reveals More People Want to Leave Las Vegas

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LAS VEGAS --  Las Vegas was once the fastest growing city in the nation, but the recession hit, and now a record number of people want to move out of the valley. A UNLV survey reveals 40 percent of Las Vegans would leave Nevada if they could. The question is why are these people leaving  Las Vegas?

Las Vegas has grown from a gambling outpost to the entertainment capital of the world. It was just a few years ago, Las Vegas was a thriving town... A symbol of growth, a Mecca for opportunity. But then the housing market crashed, gaming was down on its luck, and unemployment skyrocketed. Now these tough times

Have more people wanting to leave Las Vegas.

"If you could move, would you?"40 percent would move out of the state," said Dr. Robert futrell

 Dr. Robert Futrell is a UNLV sociology professor and author of the Las Vegas metropolitan area social survey.

The first-of-its-kind report gives us a picture into what is bothering Las Vegans who want to move.

 "Economic opportunity has been reduced in the recession, but there also is not a great sense of attachment to their community, to the neighborhood, although there is a desire for that," said Dr. Furtrell.

The survey and focus groups found we don't talk to our neighbors very much.

"It's just the lifestyle out here. You've got the ten-foot concrete walls around everyone's property, and unless there's a problem, no one wants to know you," said Chris Fiaccone, Las Vegas resident.

Chris Fiaccone would move back east if he could. But Las Vegas natives Aaron and Robin Egbert are here to stay.

"You can't pull into the bat cave, shut the door behind you, and then expect to meet your neighbors." said Aaron Egbert, Las Vegas native.

"As a native, it's a little frustrating. When times are good, Vegas is good and people love Vegas. And when the times get a little bit rough, then Vegas is bad, the school district is bad, the crime is bad, the traffic is bad, so they're kind of fair-weather friends," said Robin Egbert, Las Vegas native.

              Read the 2010 Las Vegas Metropolitan Area Social Survey

One thing there is no denying is that Las Vegas has grown into a world-class destination.

"There's a sense of pride, but there's also an interest in things like diversifying the economy," said Dr. Futrell.

And those who are staying put hope Las Vegas pulls out of the recession and once again becomes more than just a place to gamble.

This 62-thousand dollar social survey was funded by UNLV and the Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition.  To read the full survey click here.

 "Economic opportunity has been reduced in the recession, but there also is not a great sense of attachment to their community, to the neighborhood, although there is a desire for that," said Dr. Furtrell.

The survey and focus groups found we don't talk to our neighbors very much.

"It's just the lifestyle out here. You've got the ten-foot concrete walls around everyone's property, and unless there's a problem, no one wants to know you," said Chris Fiaccone, Las Vegas resident.

Chris Fiaccone would move back east if he could. But Las Vegas natives Aaron and Robin Egbert are here to stay.

"You can't pull into the bat cave, shut the door behind you, and then expect to meet your neighbors." said Aaron Egbert, Las Vegas native.

"As a native, it's a little frustrating. When times are good, Vegas is good and people love Vegas. And when the times get a little bit rough, then Vegas is bad, the school district is bad, the crime is bad, the traffic is bad, so they're kind of fair-weather friends," said Robin Egbert, Las Vegas native.

One thing there is no denying is that Las Vegas has grown into a world-class destination.

"There's a sense of pride, but there's also an interest in things like diversifying the economy," said Dr. Futrell.

And those who are staying put hope Las Vegas pulls out of the recession and once again becomes more than just a place to gamble.

This 62-thousand dollar social survey was funded by UNLV and the Southern Nevada Regional Planning Coalition.  

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